#JobsMatter (Part 1).

__What gives me sleepless nights.

Congratulations to the 12 #GoGettaz finalists I announced a few days ago at the Abuja Town Hall. At win.kwese.com you’ll see fellow entrepreneurs from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. There’s another word for these 12 finalists…#JobCreators!

By now you know that the biggest crisis facing Africa is #JobCreation. I read a report recently which said we currently have over 300m young people in Africa of working age, who have no jobs. That figure is set to double by 2030, only 13 years from now!

How we deal with that problem will shape the future of Africa, if not the world, for the remainder of this century. The problem is so huge that many political leaders are just in denial about it. Most policymakers aren’t sure how to tackle it. Progressive business leaders are worried.

President Obama once asked me what gives me sleepless nights. Without hesitation, I told him:

__“How do we create jobs in Africa?”

“I would like you to come to the White House one day, so we can discuss this issue. You are right to be thinking about it.”

I was privileged to spend time with him and discuss my ideas.

As an entrepreneur, to try to tackle this challenge, I’m using what is in “my hand.” I am not a politician or policymaker. All my life, I have started businesses, and grown businesses. I have always appreciated that this is the most assured way to generate wealth and create jobs.

__We can create jobs in Africa, through a revolutionary culture of entrepreneurship!

As a tech entrepreneur though, I’m also acutely aware that we are entering a “Fourth Industrial Revolution,” and I understand more than most that the technologies underpinning this new revolution require fewer and fewer people to carry out certain activities.

If you haven’t already, take a look at this World Economic Forum 2017 report on the future of jobs and skills in Africa — https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-future-of-jobs-and-skills-in-africa-preparing-the-region-for-the-fourth-industrial-revolution which says:

“With more than 60% of the population under the age of 25, sub-Saharan Africa is already the world’s youngest region today — and, by 2030, will be home to more than one-quarter of the world’s under-25 population.”

Crisis or opportunity? That is up to us. This is not an easy time to be trying to launch the greatest employment-creation revolution in history!

I was speaking to a well-meaning African policymaker the other day who spoke passionately about “a manufacturing revolution in his country, in order to create jobs.”

I thought to myself: “It may not be enough to create jobs, because manufacturing was principally a tool of the last industrial revolution.”

# Having a job really matters!

Not everyone can start their own business. We must help those who can start their own businesses, so they can employ others, but ultimately, we must face the huge challenge of creating employment through bold courageous policymaking, including improving and transforming our education systems to prepare our next generation for the jobs of the future (not jobs which soon will be extinct!)

I wish I could say to you, “Here’s an African country that has got this right.” I really wish I could! We are running out of time, so we must use the little time we have wisely.

I recently shared how Kofi Annan told me whilst we were traveling in Mali several years ago: “Look at all these young men milling around with nothing to do. Either they will have to cross the Sahara and Mediterranean Sea to look for work in Europe, or they will start listening to extremists, and come back to fight us.”

He was speaking prophetically, because both are happening with a vengeance!

When you take a look at the pitch videos of the Kwesé Inc #GoGettaz at win.kwese.com, you will meet African #JobCreators in the making! (Each of our finalists was given only a few days to put together his or her pitch videos on their phones, and no equipment or resources to do so).

Now it’s YOUR turn to put on your shark hat and vote for one man and one woman (you can vote for more than one of each). Just one question you might ask yourself: Whose venture will#CreateTheMostJobs?

We have no time to waste anymore.

To be continued. . .

 

by 21 Replies

About Strive Masiyiwa

Strive Masiyiwa is the Founder and Executive Chairman of Econet, a diversified global telecommunications group with operations and investments in over 15 countries. His business interests also include renewable energy, financial services, media and hospitality. Masiyiwa serves on a number of international boards, including Unilever, Rockefeller Foundation, the Council on Foreign Relations’ Global Advisory Board, the Africa Progress Panel, the UN Secretary General's Advisory Board for Sustainable Energy, Morehouse College, Hilton Foundation's Humanitarian Prize Jury and the Kenjin-Tatsujin International Advisory Council. He is one of the founders, with Sir Richard Branson, of the global think tank, the Carbon War Room, and a founding member of the Global Business Coalition on Education. Masiyiwa took over the Chairmanship of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) from Kofi Annan. He is also Chair of the Micronutrient Initiative, a global organization focused on ending child hunger and improving nutrition. In 2012, Masiyiwa was invited by President Obama to address leaders at the Camp David G-8 Summit on how to increase food production and end hunger in parts of Africa. In 2014, Masiyiwa was selected to Fortune Magazine’s list of the “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders”. As a philanthropist, he is a member of the Giving Pledge, and his contributions to education, health and development have been widely recognized. Masiyiwa and his wife finance the Higher Life Foundation, which provides scholarships to over 42,000 African orphans. In 2015, he was the recipient of the International Rescue Committee’s Freedom Award and was presented with a UN Foundation Global Leadership Award for the work of the Africa Against Ebola Solidarity Trust, which he chairs and helped establish to fund the deployment of African healthcare workers to combat the outbreak in West Africa.

21 thoughts on “#JobsMatter (Part 1).

  1. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Afterthought 2.
    This year alone we created more than 10,000 jobs in Africa with the launch of Kwesé TV!
    I believe I can create millions more by helping the entrepreneurs who follow me on this platform. What are YOU doing? This can’t be left up to governments. Tell me about some projects for entrepreneurs in your school, city or nation. #JobsMatter!

    Reply
  2. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Afterthought 5.
    “Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest,” wrote American novelist Mark Twain (Samuel L Clemens) in the mid-1800s. Some fundamentals never change!

    Reply
  3. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Kudzaishe writes,

    Besides being a pastor I also want to run businesses around the globe. I want to be an investor. Thank you my mentor. Gor bless you

    My reply,
    The Bible tells the story of a young man who was the most successful farmer in his country. He was so skilled that he could plough a field using 16 oxen; no mean feat even today!
    But the day God called him to preach the Gospel he walked away from farming completely.
    If you are truly a believer you should know that there is no greater privilege than to be called to be a Pastor. So why not emulate that young man, and go do what God told you to do:
    “Go thou and preach the gospel of the Kingdom of God”.
    But if you believe that you are called to be an entrepreneur you are welcome to do that too…but you cannot do both.
    Elisha never returned to farming again!
    This calls for wisdom in our time.

    Reply
  4. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Theo writes,

    What about if you start funding businesses while having share from those business. Many have ideas but luck funding.

    My reply,
    There is a type of entrepreneur called a Venture Capitalist.
    There is also another type of entrepreneur called A Private Equity Investor.
    The type of investors who are on Shark Tank, are a type of investor we call (Early phase, or Seed) Venture Capitalists.
    If you had a large well developed business you might draw the attention of a Private Equity (type) investor.

    Personally I’m not an investor (in either of these categories). It is a highly specialized field.

    Before you ever go out to engage someone to take (as you put it) “a share”, you will need to understand investors, and learn their language.

    Time for you to watch Kwese Inc.

    Reply
  5. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Afterthought:

    Who or what is an investor?

    So many entrepreneurs fail to raise money simply because they don’t actually understand what is an investor!

    #The worst mistake you can make as an entrepreneur is to assume that an investor is someone with a lot of money who simply wants to help others. Whilst such an investor does indeed exist , and they are known in the investment world as “impact or even social” investors; they are actually not the type of investors you should be expecting to meet or be preparing yourself for!

    If your understanding of who and what is an investor for the type of business you are doing, you will end up VERY frustrated!

    Reply
  6. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Claude writes,

    do u sometime get time to listen to new ideas and you sponsor the best?if not how do u advice us to get right investor like u?(those who respect ideas)

    My reply,
    Everyday!
    But I do it with employees and executives in our companies. It is one of the most important jobs of a business leader like me.
    This is how we drive growth of our businesses. It also happens every day in companies like MTN, Dangote, Facebook, Google, Apple.
    We look for smart (entrepreneurial) people, at all levels. We push them to come up with ideas to make our businesses better and bigger.

    #here is a really hard lesson for you:
    The concept of “sponsorship” is not in entrepreneurial language!
    We must speak the language of the game we are in. There is no “dunk” in soccer, or “curved ball” in cricket!

    If you went on Shark Tank and asked for a “sponsor” for your venture, they would kick you off the show!

    [Re: we promised each other on this platform that I would tell you what you need to know, and not what you want to hear.
    Also see my Comment on “who and what is an investor”].

    Reply
  7. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Christian writes,

    But sir. What do you have to say in a situation where your boss has refused to pay you for months yet you maintain your composure, I ask, is it right to quit the job or what? Kind reply sir.

    My reply,
    On the surface of it, you should quit right away!
    #serious!
    I have written before that people should be paid.

    The only time you stay is if you have been given shares in the business, and you are both sharing the benefits. A promise of shares is not enough; you must have a legally binding agreement and even share certificates!

    You should never accept a situation in which you are not being paid. It means you have no confidence in yourself to get either another job or start something yourself.

    Reply
  8. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Emmanuel writes,

    Sir any news on the arrival of Kwese TV (Kwese Inc) in Tanzania. We are going to the end of the year, and we are looking forward to have the same, #KweseInc, the must watch channel for entrepreneurs.

    My reply,
    We are still waiting for approval from the Tanzanian media regulator. We had all hoped to see Tanzania up by now.

    Tanzania, Namibia, and Ethiopia are the only English speaking African countries with no service. If you are from those countries please write to your regulators, and express your support for our service, and it’s benefits to you.
    Our focus for new markets has now shifted to French speaking African countries.

    Reply
  9. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Breaking News!
    Engineers from Zimbabwe’s national TV broadcaster (ZTV), Transmedia, and Kwese TV, have worked all night to onboard ZTV 1 (national station) on the Kwese TV platform. I was assured it will be live by 2pm [Saturday] but there were some technical hitches beyond everyone’s control. Hopefully it will be done by Sunday.
    It will be on Channel 230.
    Keep checking, and let me know when you get it.

    It will also be possible to watch events from within Zimbabwe using the Kwese (TV Everywhere) App once the station is live on the Kwese decoder.

    Every national broadcaster will be on Kwese Tv decoder. It is a complex process to get them all up, unless there is co-operation and partnership of the type being done in Zimbabwe over the last 24 hours.

    Events in Zimbabwe can also be followed on more than 15 international news channels available on Kwese TV.
    Well done @TeamKweseTv!

    Reply
  10. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Aban writes,

    Oh!….” impact or even social investors are actually not the type of investors you should be expecting to meet or be preparing yourself for! “. But why Sir? I thought the impact will be greater and benefit more. I’m a little confused. I will be grateful if you can elaborate more on that. Thank you.

    My reply,
    The investors who invested in Mark Zuckerberg’s business venture, called Facebook, did not do it because they wanted to “HELP”, a young guy seeking to make an impact in the world!
    They saw an opportunity to make an extraordinary amount of money.
    As an entrepreneur you should not be looking for “HELP” from investors. Avoid using that word, even if you hear the investor using it.

    Reply
  11. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Reflection:
    Today as thousands of my fellow Zimbabweans marched on the streets of Harare, I walked with them in spirit:
    I spent the day in fasting and prayer, and then took Communion.

    Every week I set aside a day for fasting and prayer over Zimbabwe.

    Today is not the day to talk about the events on the day I had to leave Zimbabwe, nearly 18 years ago. It was easily the most difficult day of my life, and even to this day I have not spoken about it. No one can ever make me talk about it, until I’m ready. And today is not that day.

    Remember the words of a wise king:

    Proverbs 29:20
    “Do you see a man who is hasty in his words? There is more hope for a [self-confident] fool than for him.”

    Who knows I might one day write a book about that day:
    The day I had to leave Zimbabwe: 22nd March 2000, never to return.

    I thank God, who preserved me on that day…and even to this day.
    I shall continue to pray for Zimbabwe, and surely we covet the prayers of all men and women who fear God.

    Reply
  12. Strive Masiyiwa Post author

    Mellen writes,

    From which channel can we get zimbabwe news

    My reply,
    I understand there was a last minute technical problem and they had to send someone with additional equipment from SA.
    They are still working on it.
    Keep checking channel 230.
    Let me know when it comes up.
    Sorry about the delay.

    Reply
    • Takudzwa C Newanji

      Hi Strive. Firslty I would like to thank you for this blog. This is fantastic!! No matter how small the lessons are sometimes, they are having a profund impact on our approach to enterprenuership and eventually philantropy.
      With unemployment in my beloved nation (zimbabwe) at 80-90%, I do agree with you we need more Jobcreators in Africa. Especially now with a predicted population growth of 1.1 billion people in Africa by 2050, the task will become more challenging, hence it’s imperative
      that we start addressing this issue now.

      Although we are a start up, My team and I have pledge to create atleast 10,000 Jobs across Africa. I think this is a better goal to have as a team as we feel we will be doing our part to fix the problem.

      Mr Masiyiwa could I offer you a cup of coffee next time when you are in London. Or can I suggest a Town Hall in London for aspiring entepreuners looking to invest into africa

      Reply
  13. Takudzwa C Newanji

    Hi Strive. Firslty I would like to thank you for this blog. This is fantastic!! No matter how small the lessons are sometimes, they are having a profund impact on our approach to enterprenuership and eventually philantropy.
    With unemployment in my beloved nation (zimbabwe) at 80-90%, I do agree with you we need more Jobcreators in Africa. Especially now with a predicted population growth of 1.1 billion people in Africa by 2050, the task will become more challenging, hence it’s imperative
    that we start addressing this issue now.

    Although we are a start up, My team and I have pledge to create atleast 10,000 Jobs across Africa. I think this is a better goal to have as a team as we feel we will be doing our part to fix the problem.

    Mr Masiyiwa could I offer you a cup of coffee next time when you are in London. Or can I suggest a Town Hall in London for aspiring entepreuners looking to invest into africa

    Reply
  14. Sello

    Firstly Mr Masiyiwa… Grace, mercy and peace will be with us from God the Father and from Jesus Christ, the Father’s Son, in truth and love. This verse from 1John1:3 has become my greeting to all who commune under the immeasurable grace. I am a content creator based in SA; it was with great joy to see your KWESE building at Bryanston; a revelation that the playing field for Satellite television has opened up thus opening yet another door for us African content creators. Do you have in place an initiative or platform to curate, buy or license content from independent content creators from the regions where KWESE is available….which I can foresee is EVERYWHERE…as the name clearly reveals? If so who can I get in contact with at KWESE? Thanks Sir. (PS: You are an inspiration to many of us who a have a vision far beyond just owing one business entity. Africa needs visionary Africans to rise us up to the next level…of course always putting the Lord first in all we do to ensure prosperity.)

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *